The Law Explained 2018: Is Burning Rubbish In Your Garden Legal?

Cleaning your garden can be a mess. Most of the times, it could be filled up broken tree branches and a lot of dry leaves. Therefore, most of us resort to first cleaning up the leaves and other residues and then burning to them straight over in our garden. But, in 2018, especially in the urban areas – burning of garden rubbish and waste is not at all allowed. There has been a lot of confusion regarding the legal rules, so following are some of the rules mentioned below, for your better understanding.

Legal Consequences Of Burning Rubbish In Your Garden

  • Causing Problems For Neighbours : Burning any kind of rubbish in your garden, especially in urban areas is not at all allowed. You can only burn wood for cooking, and braziers for the heating purpose, until and unless it doesn’t cause any problems for your neighbours. When it comes to rural areas, it would be wise to check any kind of bans on starting a fire and make sure that you may or may not need a permit for doing it. If you do need help in cleaning your garden, with lawn mowers, you can visit https://verellenhc.com/outdoors/lawn-mower/best-self-propelled, for all the best lawn mowers reviewed.
  • Burning Hazardous Wastes : Burning of wastes like rubber, plastic, fabrics, tins, glass, etc. is totally not allowed. The reason is that, burning things like these release a lot of harmful toxic gases, that is harmful to the environment as well for you and your neighbours. It causes heart diseases, lung cancer, various breathing diseases and problems, etc. So it’s better to avoid actions like this.
  • Incinerator Burning Rules : If you’re planning to burn garden wastes in your Incinerator, make sure you comply with the following laws :
  1. the Incinerator must be at least 3 metres from your house boundary and 12 metres from any building.
  2. You have to make sure sufficient air is circulation through the fire.
  3. The incinerator is not left unguarded.
  4. Good amount of water supplies are present to put out the fire.
  5. The incinerator mustn’t be anywhere near to something, that may be flammable or catch fire easily.